One for Sorrow, Two for Joy

Let’s Keep Walmart out of Our Classrooms, OK?

aflcio:

Summer’s about gone, and kids and teachers are getting ready to head back to school.

image

Back-to-school isn’t the most fun time of year, but it is especially hard for teachers and students when there are billionaire families, like the Walmart-owning Waltons, gearing up to use…

Voyager’s Golden Record

Since I just finished marathoning Cosmos, it seems like  good laylist:does anyone know where to get all the music that was recorded on Voyager’s golden record?

The 19th Century Solar Engines of Augustin Mouchot, Abel Pifre, and John Ericsson

So I just reblogged someone’s idea for solarpunk, which would involve a green near future influenced by art nouveau and perhaps Edwardian aesthetics, less minimalist and more artisan than a lot of future images. Which sounded great.

I’m watch Cosmos and was pretty familiar with a lot of it, but I didn’t know about the history of solar energy, or about Augustin Mouchot, who got a gold metal for his solar engine at the 1878 Universal Exhibition, only to be told his work was not needed when coal prices dropped.

I admit I’d no idea this existed.

(Totally ties into the solarpunk ideas, and again makes me wonder why steampunk sometimes looks at social issues but never seems to look at the environmental issues of the era.)

cbrachyrhynchos:

nineprotons:

notapaladin:

prettylittlerobbers:

missolivialouise:

Here’s a thing I’ve had around in my head for a while!

Okay, so I’m pretty sure that by now everyone at least is aware of Steampunk, with it’s completely awesome Victorian sci-fi aesthetic. But what I want to see is Solarpunk – a plausible near-future sci-fi genre, which I like to imagine as based on updated Art Nouveau, Victorian, and Edwardian aesthetics, combined with a green and renewable energy movement to create a world in which children grow up being taught about building electronic tech as well as food gardening and other skills, and people have come back around to appreciating artisans and craftspeople, from stonemasons and smithies, to dress makers and jewelers, and everyone in between. A balance of sustainable energy-powered tech, environmental cities, and wicked cool aesthetics. 

A lot of people seem to share a vision of futuristic tech and architecture that looks a lot like an ipod – smooth and geometrical and white. Which imo is a little boring and sterile, which is why I picked out an Art Nouveau aesthetic for this.

With energy costs at a low, I like to imagine people being more inclined to focus their expendable income on the arts!

Aesthetically my vision of solarpunk is very similar to steampunk, but with electronic technology, and an Art Nouveau veneer.

So here are some buzz words~

Natural colors!
Art Nouveau!
Handcrafted wares!
Tailors and dressmakers!
Streetcars!
Airships!
Stained glass window solar panels!!!
Education in tech and food growing!
Less corporate capitalism, and more small businesses!
Solar rooftops and roadways!
Communal greenhouses on top of apartments!
Electric cars with old-fashioned looks!
No-cars-allowed walkways lined with independent shops!
Renewable energy-powered Art Nouveau-styled tech life!

Can you imagine how pretty it would be to have stained glass windows everywhere that are actually solar panels? The tech is already headed in that direction!  Or how about wide-brim hats, or parasols that are topped with discreet solar panel tech incorporated into the design, with ports you can stick your phone charger in to?

(((Character art by me; click the cityscape pieces to see artist names)))

i am so into this wow

sign me the fuck up

I want a solarpunk future. *_*

Wow.

(via whatisthisidefk)

Marry your best friend. I do not say that lightly. Really, truly find the strongest, happiest friendship in the person you fall in love with. Someone who speaks highly of you. Someone you can laugh with. The kind of laughs that make your belly ache, and your nose snort. The embarrassing, earnest, healing kind of laughs. Wit is important. Life is too short not to love someone who lets you be a fool with them. Make sure they are somebody who lets you cry, too. Despair will come. Find someone that you want to be there with you through those times. Most importantly, marry the one that makes passion, love, and madness combine and course through you. A love that will never dilute - even when the waters get deep, and dark.

—N’tima  (via coffeekaling)

(Source: mariaarroyo, via this-too-too-sullied-flesh)

mustbekarma:

So far adulthood is just going grocery shopping, realizing you didn’t plan well or logically, going grocery shopping again, repeat ad infinitum. 0/10 stars, would not recommend

(via keepcalm-anddontpanic)

Our Universe May Have Emerged from a Black Hole in a Higher Dimensional Universe

I’m decent at biology news and chemistry news but I’ve reread this twice and they keep losing me at higher dimensional universe. Can someone explain physics to me?

risarodil:

Really excited to let you know that this poster, featuring one of my favorite quotes from Hank, is now available at DFTBA Records! And it’s 20% off until September 1st!

risarodil:

Really excited to let you know that this poster, featuring one of my favorite quotes from Hank, is now available at DFTBA Records! And it’s 20% off until September 1st!

(via wilwheaton)

amandatollesonart:

another progress shot of mal. everything is scratchy textures now what the heck.

It’s brilliant, in progress or not. Beautiful warmth, great lighting, and he was a scratchy kinda guy, so I think even the texture works!
(And the slight mouth quirk expression. *sigh*)

amandatollesonart:

another progress shot of mal. everything is scratchy textures now what the heck.

It’s brilliant, in progress or not. Beautiful warmth, great lighting, and he was a scratchy kinda guy, so I think even the texture works!

(And the slight mouth quirk expression. *sigh*)

(via cecilgershwinspalmer)

fer1972:

Today’s Classic: Alchemists

1. By Adriaen van Ostade (1661)

2. By David Teniers (c. 1640)

3. By Mattheus van Hellemont (c. 1650)

4. By Cornelis Vega (1663)

5. By Dutch School (17th. Century)